Session Duration 2014

June 23 - July 17,2014

Credits

4 credits for 2 courses (Required)
Choose 2 courses out of 6 regular courses

1 credit for Japanese language class (Optional)
Choose 1 course out of 6 Japanese courses

Professors

  • Yoshihiko ABE, Visiting Professor, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • Junsuke IKEGAMI, Associate Professor, Faculty of Commerce, Waseda University
  • Tai Wei LIM, Assistant Professor, Department of Japanese Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Mieko NAKABAYASHI, Associate Professor, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • Yuichiro ONISHI, Associate Professor, African American & African Studies, and Asian American Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • Toru SHINODA, Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, Waseda University
  • Takano TAKAKO, Professor, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • John Willis TRAPHAGAN, Professor, Department of Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Religious Studies, University of Texas at Austin
  • Mitsuru YAMADA, Visiting Associate Professor, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • Kazuhiko YOKOTA, Professor, Faculty of Commerce, Waseda University

Courses Description

BUSINESS I
INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE BUSINESS
JUSUKE IKEGAMI, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERSITY
KAZUHIKO YOKOTA, PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERSITY
YOSHIHIKO ABE, VISITING PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERSITY
MITSURU YAMADA, VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERSITY

This introductory course provides an overview of the contemporary political issues and controversies in the field of international relations, in light of the empirical cases drawn mainly from the Asia-Pacific region including the United States, with an emphasis on Japan and the United States. Topics include (among others) measurement and perception of power, political regimes and domestic politics, nationalism and historical memory, deterrence, alliance politics, regional integration and economic interdependence. The course also attempts to draw attention to the budget process which influences and controls all emerging public policies. The sessions aim to encourage an active and informed interest in politics by demonstrating the relevance of such topics to contemporary political events. The overall objective of this course is for students to gain the ability to understand, analyze, and objectively evaluate the complex mixture of phenomena through theoretical perspectives.

Syllabus

CULTURE I
JAPANESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY
JOHN WILLIS TRAPHAGAN, PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
TAKANO TAKAKO, PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERISTY

This course is intended as an introduction to the diversity of culture and lifestyles that exist in Japan. We will begin by exploring the concept of culture as it is used in anthropology and will then move to an application of that concept to the Japanese context. Our aim will be to develop a general understanding of the complexities of the Japanese experience by looking at such as kinship and family, political organization, life course, gender, death, education, ethnicity, and religion. We will combine readings, lectures, films, and novels with critical discussion to think about both ways in which the Japanese inhabit and contest cultural frames.

Syllabus

CULTURE II
SELF AND BODY IN EAST ASIA AND THE WEST
JOHN WILLIS TRAPHAGAN, PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
TAKANO TAKAKO, PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERISTY

In this course, we will compare concepts of mind and body that have developed in cultures of East Asia, with an emphasis on Japan, and the North Atlantic. The aim of the course is to consider both philosophical and empirical research on mind and body and to think about how different concepts of mind and body are both influenced by and influence culture. At the core of our study will be a consideration of how the “self” is constructed in different cultures and how this shapes ideas about the nature of human being as well as what it means to be human.

Syllabus

HISTORY I
J-POP & ITS GLOBALIZATION, ENVIRONMENT/ENERGY THEMES
TAI WEI LIM, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

This course surveys the historical development of contemporary Japanese popular culture grounded in three paradigms: globalization, environment and energy themes. In examining the ideas of globalization, the course critically looks at William Tsutsui’s ideas about the production and reception of Japanese popular culture. How are Godzilla, Hello Kitty and Pokemon products of hybridization of different cultures? How do features of these products resonate with local audiences in East Asia and North America? The course will also critically examine Anne Allison’s case study of Pikachu’s success in North America and Koichi Iwabuchi’s ideas on re-centering globalization and the ‘cultural odor’ concept. In this discussion on globalization and indigenization, ideas, perceptions and aesthetics related to energy and environmental themes will be fore-grounded and analyzed. Case studies related to the interpretations and social contextualization of Hayao Miyazaki’s ‘Spirited Away’, Tetsuwan Atom, Doraemon and Godzilla will be useful in this sense.

Syllabus

HISTORY II
JAPAN AND THE COLOR LINE:GLOBAL AND LOCAL DIMENSIONS
YUICHIRO ONISHI, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA TWIN CITIES
TORU SHINODA, PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERSITY

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line.” said W. E. B. Du Bois, the towering African American scholar, human and civil rights activist, and Pan-Africanist and anti colonial leader. Writing at the turn of the twentieth century, Du Bois apprehended the modern world system built upon racial hierarchy. Drawing on his prophecy, this class will set out to investigate Japan’s place in the world of racial privilege and prejudice. That is to say, we will explore the complex phenomena, whereby the navigation of the globality of race in opposition to racism and imperialism brought African Americans and Japan and its people closer together since the late 19th century. Yet, at the same time, the development of modern Japan has been tightly bound up with empire building, specifically the creation of its own color line toward minorities, such as Okinawans, indigenous people called Ainu, and Zainichi Koreans. Through readings, lectures, films, guest speakers, and excursions, we will approach the study of modern Japan as a case study in the formation of a racial nation-state, so as to imagine and reason otherwise in the service of creating a more inclusive and egalitarian modern society.

Syllabus

POLITICS I
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: CONTEMPORARY POLITICS IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC
MIEKO NAKABAYASHI, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, WASEDA UNIVERSITY

This course examines Japan’s political economy from historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives. After reviewing the historical development of Japanese politics, we will examine the organization and function of political parties, factions, and local electoral machines. The latter portion of the course takes a close look at the government’s decision-making processes in the areas of economic regulation and social policies. Finally, we carefully evaluate the social and economic consequences of these policy outcomes. In addition to increasing familiarity with Japanese political economy, this course is explicitly intended to enhance each student’s social scientific analytical thinking capabilities, using Japanese politics as an empirical case. For this reason, although our empirical focus is Japan, we will locate the country within the context of broad comparative perspectives. Students will contrast Japanese politics with the politics of other advanced industrial democracies as well as Japan's neighbors in East Asia. By scrutinizing the Japanese case, we will explore the role of institutions and social forces in shaping policy choices. We will also assess the strengths and weaknesses of various social scientific approaches.

Syllabus

Japanese Language Class

Either one of the following skill-based subject classes can be taken as optional during the Summer Session.
Japanese class is 2nd period (10:40-12:10), Monday through Friday, for 3 weeks from June 20 - July 10.

  • - Let’s Talk in Japanese 1
  • - Listening and Speaking through Thinking 2
  • - Pronunciation Activity 1-2
  • - Learning Japanese Conversation through Listening and Speaking Practice 3
  • - Learning Japanese Conversation through Listening and Speaking Practice 4
  • - Presentation in Japanese 3-4

* The numbers after the subject names are associated with the Japanese proficiency level as follows.

the Japanese proficiency level

»» Check your level with the description of Japanese Classes

Course Schedules

schedule table

* Optional Japanese class starts on June 20.
* Business I and History II are irregular schedule.
* Time Schedule is subject to change.

Grading Policies

The student's academic performance is assessed according to four different criteria: class participation, attendance, assignments and exams. Each professor, however, may prefer a different attendance policy, and in such case, students should follow the professor's guidelines. Generally, course performance is graded on the following 100-point scale:

90-100A+
80-89A
70-79B
60-69C
0-59F

Grading is professor's authority and privilege that the Summer Session office cannot interfere with.

Credit System and Transfer

・Credit System

As a general rule, students must attend 3 or 4 classes per week as follows:

 MonTueWedThuFri
1st week1234 
2nd week5678 
3rd week9101112 
4th week131415  

Students can earn 2 credits through 1 regular course. Each class is 90 minutes long and held 15 times. This means that it is necessary for students to attend each course for a total of 22.5 hours (1350 minutes (90×15)) to earn 2 credits.

・Credit Transfer

Waseda University will issue an official academic transcript for the participants. We will send it to the designated address around the middle of September. Students who wish to transfer the Summer Session program credits are advised to consult with the appropriate academic authorities at their home institutions in advance, whether or not the home institutions are Waseda's exchange partners. The home institution's academic advisors decide whether a particular Waseda Summer Session course may be applied towards the major or elective requirement. Students usually refer to the uploaded syllabus on our Waseda Summer Session website to determine credit transferability to their home institution.

Extracurricular Activity

Field Trips

Visiting students can take a trip with Waseda students to places of cultural and historic interest around Japan. Make new friends and learn more about Japan at the same time!
Themed fieldworks, ranging from half-day to longer periods, will also be organized for some classes by the faculty.

Japanese Festival

Experience Japanese culture through different perspectives and activities, such as a tea ceremony or trying on a yukata, with Waseda student clubs.

Visitor Sessions

Visiting students will have opportunities to socialize with Waseda students over discussions on various topics.

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