Session Duration 2015

June 27 - July 23, 2015

Credits

4 credits for 2 courses (Required)
Choose 2 courses out of 10 regular courses

1 credit for Japanese language class (Optional)
Choose 1 course out of 3 levels

Professors

  • Prof. Hironori HIGASHIDE, Waseda Business School, Waseda University
  • Prof. Mieko NAKABAYASHI, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • Prof. Yoshiko NOZAKI, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • Prof. Takano TAKAKO, Center for International Education, Waseda University
  • Prof. Kealoha Lee WIDDOWS, Waseda University (Wabash College)
  • Prof. Parissa HAGHIRIAN, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Sophia University
  • Prof. Tai Wei LIM, Senior Lecturer SIM University and Research Fellow Adj East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore
  • Prof. Frank PLANTAN, International Relations Program, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prof. John Willis TRAPHAGAN, Department of Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Religious Studies, University of Texas at Austin

Courses Description

Business I
Japanese Business and Management

Prof. Parissa HAGHIRIAN, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Sophia University

This introduction course presents Japan as a place of business and provides an overview on the main aspects of Japanese management. It discusses Japanese social and cultural concepts which form the base of the J-Firm and describes the Japanese business environment and consumer markets. Major points of discussion are production management, distribution, human resource and knowledge management within Japanese corporations. Students will investigate the topic in form of interactive discussions, case studies, a field project and a company visit.

Syllabus

Business II
Underlying Logic of Japanese Business

Prof. Hironori HIGASHIDE, Waseda Business School, Waseda University

The purpose of this course is NOT to describe what Japanese business is. Rather, it focuses on discussing (1) what possible underlying principles leading to the current Japanese business practices are,(2) what pros and cons of these are in the current 'innovative' society, and (3)what changes necessary for Japanese society and/or Japanese companies are suggested by the participants' observation and points of view. For this purpose, some company visits might be arranged.

Topics to be dealt with include entrepreneurship in Japan, long-lasting family businesses, how Japanese perceive and understand themselves, typologies of Japanese culture and so forth. See you there!

Syllabus

Culture I
Japanese Culture and Society

Prof. John Willis TRAPHAGAN, Department of Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Religious Studies, University of Texas at Austin
Prof. Takano TAKAKO, Center for International Education, Waseda University

This course is intended as an introduction to the diversity of culture and lifestyles that exist in Japan. We will begin by exploring the concept of culture as it is used in anthropology and will then move to an application of that concept to the Japanese context. Our aim will be to develop a general understanding of the complexities of the Japanese experience by looking at elements such as kinship and family, political organization, life course, gender, death, education, ethnicity, and identity. We will combine readings, lectures and critical discussion to think about ways in which the Japanese inhabit and contest cultural frames.

Syllabus

Culture II
Japanese Religion and Ethics in the Western Imagination

Prof. John Willis TRAPHAGAN, Department of Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Religious Studies, University of Texas at Austin
Prof. Takano TAKAKO, Center for International Education, Waseda University

This course focuses on how Japanese religious traditions, particularly Zen, have been viewed from the perspective of people living in non-Japanese societies since the end of World War II. Using Ruth Benedict’s book The Chrysanthemum and the Sword as a starting point, we will explore different ways in which non-Japanese have imagined Japanese religious and ethical ideas and both explained Japanese behavior and adopted (often stereotyped) ideas about Japan into their writings about philosophy and life. We will discuss and deconstruct works by authors such as Alan Watts, Eugene Herrigel (Zen in the Art of Archery), and Roberg Pirsig (Zen in the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) as a framework for thinking about how Japanese religious and ethical ideas have been imagined in the West.

Syllabus

Culture III
Japanese Popular Culture: Globalization, Cultural production / Consumption & Creative Ecology.

Prof. Tai Wei LIM, Senior Lecturer SIM University and Research Fellow Adj East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

This course is centered round an interdisciplinary area studies (specifically Japanese studies) approach to studying Japanese popular culture. It is divided into three main sections. For its conceptual and theoretical approach, the Japanese studies course employs area studies perspectives in ethnography, globalization studies, historical perspectives and cultural studies to examine the subject matter. In examining the ideas of globalization, the course critically looks at the ethnography and ecology of creative production through Ian Condry’s seminal work on anime industry. In terms of mechanisms of dissemination, it then examines how globalization facilitated the popularity and proliferation of Japanese ACG (Anime, Comics, Games) products through Matthew Allen and Rumi Sakamoto’s edited volume and William Tsutsui’s accessible text (e.g. concepts of hybridization) on this topic. The last section of the course will focus on some case studies of popular cultural products. How do features of these products resonate with local audiences in East Asia and North America? Doraemon and Godzilla are also useful case studies in this area. The course will also critically examine fandom consumption in Anne Allison’s case study of Pikachu’s success in North America.

Syllabus

Economics I
Encountering Tokyo: A Look at the History, Business, Politics, and Economics of the World’s Most Fascinating City

Prof. Kealoha Lee WIDDOWS, Waseda University (Wabash College)

The primary text for this course is the great city of Tokyo. Largely burned to the ground in World War II, Tokyo rose from the ashes to become the largest metropolitan economy in the world and a global epicenter for finance, business, media, technology, and pop culture. Through a series of readings, moderated discussions, as well as regular class travel to actively engage sites and institutions around the city of Tokyo, we will interrogate Tokyo’s recent history, current economic and political challenges, and the lifestyle of its residents through a multi-disciplinary lens.

Students who complete this course will have a broad understanding of Abenomics including its potential effect on the everyday lives of Tokyo residents; the recent history and complexity of Japanese politics and the prospect for policy reform; the rise and fall of the iconic technology company, Sony and what this may portend for Japanese business; aspects of the daily lives of Tokyoites; and the current employment outlook for the traditional salaryman as well as NEETS – young people Not in Education, Employment, or Training.

Syllabus

History I
The Contemporary History of Heisei Japan - An Area Studies Approach in Examining Historical Transitions in Postwar and Contemporary Japan

Prof. Tai Wei LIM, Senior Lecturer SIM University and Research Fellow Adj East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

This historical survey and area studies course introduces class participants to selected issues and developments in contemporary Japan. It studies the crucial debates, challenges and trends that have shaped the Japanese history, including developmental history, natural disaster recovery, environmental perspectives, demographics, culture and society. It does not pretend to be comprehensive but utilizes these selected issues to motivate class participants to analyze critically contemporary Japan from eclectic perspectives. Two focused cases studies, the Great East Japan Earthquake recovery as well as the demographic transition in Japan, will be discussed in the course. Embedded in the course are fieldtrips and video presentation for the experiential learning experience.

Syllabus

Politics I
International Relations: Contemporary Politics in the Asia-Pacific

Prof. Mieko NAKABAYASHI, Center for International Education, Waseda University

This introductory course provides an overview of contemporary political issues and controversies in the field of international relations in light of empirical cases drawn mainly from the Asia-Pacific region, with an emphasis on Japan. Topics include an introduction to international relations theory, nationalism and historical memory, political regimes and domestic politics, regional integration, and economic interdependence. The course will also draw attention to the budgetary processes that influence and control emerging public policies. Classes will consist of interactive lectures, presentations by students, and group work, as well as presentations by guest speakers. There is also an opportunity for students to visit the Japanese Diet (and to meet with elected members if in session); visiting the Yasukuni Shrine may also be an option. This course aims to encourage an active and informed interest in international politics by demonstrating the relevance of such topics to contemporary political events in Japan and the Asia-Pacific region. Its overall objective is to enable students to develop the ability to understand, analyze, and objectively evaluate a complex mixture of phenomena through theoretical perspectives.

Syllabus

Politics II
Political Risk Analysis in the East Asian Context

Prof. Frank PLANTAN, International Relations Program, University of Pennsylvania

Imagine yourself as the chief executive of a major Japanese corporation seeking to expand your business overseas in the United States, India, China, Korea, or elsewhere in East Asia. As you look abroad, you see large markets and a world full of opportunity for your company. But you also observe a rapidly changing and sometimes threatening global business environment characterized by political and economic risk and uncertainty. You face foreign publics who are often angry, hostile, and capricious in their tastes; constantly shifting political winds, aggressive and unpredictable regulators, potentially unreliable business partners, economic crises and instability, in addition to the risks of terrorism and political violence.

How will you cope with these problems? What tools and methodologies will you employ to forecast these risks? Enroll in the “Political Risk Analysis in the East Asian Context” if you want to learn about these subjects. The course will address cutting edge political risk forecasting and management methodologies and techniques.

Syllabus

Sociology I
Japan and Politics over Education: Ethnic Minorities and Women

Prof. Yoshiko NOZAKI, Center for International Education, Waseda University

This course will explore Japanese education from viewpoints of Japan’s internal diversity and its politics in today’s rapidly globalizing and internationalizing world. In particular, we will tackle the issues and practices of Japanese education from the perspectives of ethnic minorities and women, aiming at disrupting the stereotype(s) of Japan as a nation that clings to a belief in its own homogeneity and conformity. We will also address the issues of mainstream Japanese educational politics, policies, and practices in the process of looking at Japan’s minorities and women. The issues involved are examined through time somewhat historically and within the social, cultural, political, and global contexts of contemporary lives. A field trip will be organized in relation to the course content.

Syllabus

Courses Offered in the Past

2014

Japanese Language Class

Either one of the following skill-based subject classes can be taken as optional during the Summer Session.

* The numbers after the subject names are associated with the Japanese proficiency level as follows.

the Japanese proficiency level

»» Check your level with the description of Japanese Classes

Course Schedules

schedule table

* Class schedule is subject to change.
* Some filedworks are scheduled on Friday and weekends.

Grading Policies

The student's academic performance is assessed according to four different criteria: class participation, attendance, assignments and exams. Each professor, however, may prefer a different attendance policy, and in such case, students should follow the professor's guidelines. Generally, course performance is graded on the following 100-point scale:

90-100A+
80-89A
70-79B
60-69C
0-59F

Grading is professor's authority and privilege that the Summer Session office cannot interfere with.

Credit System and Transfer

・Credit System

Students can earn 2 credits through 1 regular course. Each class is 90 minutes long and held 15 times. This means that it is necessary for students to attend each course for a total of 22.5 hours (1350 minutes (90×15)) to earn 2 credits.

・Credit Transfer

Waseda University will issue an official academic transcript for the participants. We will send it to the designated address around the middle of September. Students who wish to transfer the Summer Session program credits are advised to consult with the appropriate academic authorities at their home institutions in advance, whether or not the home institutions are Waseda's exchange partners. The home institution's academic advisors decide whether a particular Waseda Summer Session course may be applied towards the major or elective requirement. Students usually refer to the uploaded syllabus on our Waseda Summer Session website to determine credit transferability to their home institution.

Extracurricular Activity

Field Trips

Visiting students can take a trip with Waseda students to places of cultural and historic interest around Japan. Make new friends and learn more about Japan at the same time! Themed fieldworks, ranging from half-day to longer periods, will also be organized for some classes by the faculty.

Japanese Cultural Week

Experience Japanese culture through different perspectives and activities, such as a tea ceremony or trying on a yukata, with Waseda student clubs.

Visitor Sessions

Visiting students will have opportunities to socialize with Waseda students over discussions on various topics.

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